While Spring has sprung, it appears to be slowly springing. Oh my gosh! It’s official. I am officially tired of rain. To solve my doomy, gloomy springless Spring, I took a walk through the nursery. They say a picture is worth a thousand words, so I’m going to hit you with a lot of pictures in an attempt to spring you out of your Springless Spring, hoping to Spring it. Okay, I’m exhausted. I’m sure you are, too.

This Sunday I will be on the radio with Farmer Fred. If you tune in to the KFBK Garden Show this Sunday, I will be on starting at 9:00 a.m. and then at 10:00 a.m., I will be springing over to Get Growing with Farmer Fred, Talk 650-KSTE. That’s a lot of talking on a talk show. We’ll be talking about all kinds of talking points, talking topics and just plain talking. I was told by Farmer Fred that I can be as snarky as I want, so I’m going to amp up on as much caffeine as I can so we can talk our talking points about a Springless Spring that’s trying to be sprung.

I took a walk through the nursery and took a few pictures illustrating that while Spring has not sprung, or at least it seems as if it is sprungless, at High Hand Nursery I can assure you Spring is springing.

While Spring is always associated with blooming flowers, I’m a foliage guy. I look at flowers as a byproduct. Now, understand I like flowers. It’s what I do for a living, but when we design landscapes for our clients, I tend to focus on foliage first and flowers second.

This is hakonechloa, otherwise known as Japanese Forest Grass. I love it for dark, shady areas. It goes dormant in the winter and is very faithful coming back in the Spring. We grow this plant right here at High Hand Nursery.

Here is hakonechloa (say that 3 times) growing in my garden at Maple Rock. I love it.

So, let’s let the pictures roll.

A view of High Hand Nursery  

If you have any doubt that Spring has NOT sprung, I would argue with that.

A bird’s eye view from our water swans in the greenhouse. Evidence that Spring has sprung. Still not convinced Spring has been sprung? Fresh off our world famous Willie Wonka Flower Basket machine.

Let us shock you with our “Shocking Purple” basket. Zap!

Got your jeans on? Let’s go dancing with “Dancing Jeans”. Yes, that’s the name.

I like peppermint candy. You know the candy that’s always in the bowl as you leave the restaurant? Now you can have it in a flower basket. We call it “Peppermint Candy”, go figure.

I’m a Peter Pan fan, so I call this basket ‘Pirate’s Beauty’. The petunia in the picture is called ‘Johnny Flame’. It’s kind of like street names. None of the names really make sense sometimes.

And if you want to rock in your dancing jeans, then come in and check out “Rockin Red”.

A few tips to growing our flower baskets. They love to eat and they love hair cuts. Feed them with a slow release All-Purpose fertilizer 14-14-14 or close, and cut them back when they get leggy. Our baskets are grown here at High Hand in 14″ pots, allowing room for plants to mature throughout the season without being impacted by roots. Come and select yours off the Willie Wonka flower basket machine. They are moving out fast.

If you were thinking Spring has not sprung, I think you’re no longer having those thoughts. Spring has sprung at High Hand Nursery. Here are a few more of my places to visit in the nursery besides our fabulous greenhouse. 

The hosta, heuchera and hakonechloa house, all great colorful perennials for shade. As I told you I love foliage color, I also love dependability. Tune in this Sunday with Farmer Fred as we’re going to talk about these dependable perennials.

I love Japanese Maples. Don’t have much more to say about them other than “I really love Japanese Maples”. We have the coolest selection of every size, shape and color you can imagine. Yes, Farmer Fred and I will be talking about Japanese Maples, this Sunday on the KFBK Garden Show, 93.1 FM/1530AM KFBK-Sacramento. And then we’ll be running over to Get Growing With Farmer Fred, Talk650-KSTE Sacramento.  Ok, Fred did I get that right? That’s a lot of back slashing, numbers and letters.

My favorite Japanese Maple, Acer palmatum ‘Ryusen’. I use it as a groundcover.

Acer shirasawanum ‘Full Moon’. Very cool, slow growing maple for full shade and for brightening up the shady darkness

I like foliage color and the dependability of geraniums.

Who says you can’t grow peonies in Sacramento?

My favorite azalea, “Red Ruffles”. I’ve been using this azalea for years in landscaping. It is a dependable bloomer and a consistent grower. Did I mention it’s a rebloomer? It does not say it on the tag, but trust me, it reblooms in the garden.

High Hand vegetables are here. I came out here yesterday and picked a salad right off our vegetable tables. Fun! Come in and pick out a pot and plant a salad. It’s a cut and come again plant. It will provide many salads from one bowl.

High Hand’s famous basil trees. Let me explain. This is a Greek basil, called Savour. When it is grafted onto a hardy variety of wild basil, it creates a hardy perennial basil if brought into a sunny window in wintertime. It’s excellent taste can be snipped right into the pan for the freshest of freshness.

Can we switch subjects for a minute? Are we done with case building that Spring has sprung? I think I’ve made my case. Spring is here so spring on into High Hand Nursery.

May 13th, High Hand Nursery presents Bloomtastic at Maple Rock Gardens.

Tickets for Maple Rock Gardens are $10.00 and can be purchased online at www.highhand.com or at the nursery. Parking is free and our new entrance from Highway 193 to the garden is wide open and easily accessible after a year of construction.

If you’re still not convinced of a springing, sprung Spring that has sprung, then join me this Sunday as Farmer Fred and I get snarky on the radio. Isn’t this ridiculous that we’re all bundled up at the end of April?

Whew! I’m exhausted from all the tongue twisting words. If pictures don’t say a thousand words that Spring has sprung, then I can’t help you. Who doesn’t like pictures?

See you at High Hand Nursery. See you on the radio this Sunday with Farmer Fred.

Scott

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